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BLSD Project Hawaii Is Blessing The Kids Of Wahiawa


STN is excited to announce that the Ulu Pono kids program has been chosen as the first ‘ one for one’  project by local apparel company Blessed Project Hawaii (BLSD).

Read about their mission from their website below:
“”Our mission is to spread blessings to people in need, particularly children.  For every shirt we sell, we will give one to a person in need.  We have all been blessed with so many things in this world.  Sometimes we get too caught up in what we want for ourselves.  We should stop for a moment and realize that the things we take for granted everyday, someone else is praying for. We have all been blessed so that we can Bless others.
 
The Blessed Project Hawaii is a for-profit organization.  We understand that we cannot create a movement alone.  If we can get people to buy a shirt, we are able to get them to buy into giving.  The more people we can get to give (in any way), the more we can start to see a change in the world.   We will be starting all projects in Hawaii and plan to target one district at a time.  If we could get the support from each district, while on the project, we can start to see more smiles and perhaps some improvements.
 

Although a free T-Shirt for someone in need may seem like a small act, we believe that it can lead to greater and bigger acts of kindness ,progression, and togetherness. We would also like to raise an awareness of selflessness and the spirit of giving. For who ever wears “BLSD” apparel, we want them not to just look good but to feel good as well.”
 

For every shirt that BLSD sells, they will give one to a child in the  Ulu Pono Kids program. It is a very special and often rare thing for the kids to be able to get brand new clothing items. It will be an amazing way to invest in a child and show them they are worth it!
 

Their goal is to donate 100 shirts-. The prices range from 20 to 30 dollars per shirt, and there is also bags, hats, and stickers- all supporting the Blessed Hawaii Project.
Check it out! (the tote and stickers are some of our personal favorites)!
Contact and follow BLSD online:
Instagram- @blsdproject

Ohai Family Festival

Today’s blog comes from Katie Connor,  the director of STN’s Ulu Pono program. To see more photos and read more about her life working with the kids of Wahiawa, visit her blog.

 

Do you remember your first piano recital or football game? The weeks of practice and the butterflies in your stomach? Do you remember looking up into the bleachers or squinting from the bright stage into the dark crowd? And there they were: the people who had pushed (maybe slightly forced) you to be there. They looked at you with love and pride, trying to mask their own anxiety for you. They belonged to you; they were your parents.

I remember many moments like this growing up and I long for those moments now when I’m living thousands of miles away. But the kids I work with don’t ever get moments like that. Maybe mom and dad are too busy, or gone completely, or just uninterested. Many of the kids have never been to a soccer practice or a ballet class. The street is where they spend their afternoons. The street and the Ulu Pono Kids Program. They may never hear their parents tell them how proud they were or that it was okay that they dropped the final pass. Often times it just isn’t a part of their culture. But that doesn’t mean that we can’t tell them we are proud of them! So this weekend, that is exactly what we did!

The Ohai Family Festival was a dream that we had cultivated for over a year before it came to pass. Many hours of dreaming, hoping, wishing and planning came to life in a beautiful afternoon. For four hours last Saturda,y everything was about the kids. The games, the prizes, the music, the shave ice. All because we were proud of them and we loved them.

Half way through the afternoon, we awarded each child from the program a “Character Award” they were called up on stage in front of everyone and amazingly there were even some parents in the crowd. They got a hug, a certificate, encouragement and an affirmation by different staff members. Most of them got really shy about it, red cheeked and squirming they got on stage and while they acted like they wanted to run off the stage, I know them better than that. They love, love. Don’t we all?

It’s hard to gauge success when working with kids. How do you measure “getting into less trouble” or “headed on a better path”?   Three days after the festival, I went to pick up a 5 year old boy from his home. I know his parents well and his mom had come to the festival. I walked through the living room that consists of several mattresses and barely enough room to walk and picked up his baby sister out of the crib. That’s when I spotted it. His purple certificate pinned amongst the mess up on the wall. My heart swelled with pride and I choked up as the reality that his parents had taken the time to make sure his award was hung really sunk in. That is the kind of “success” I want to see. The kind that transforms an entire family from the inside out.  -KC