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Surf Art and the Surfer Recap

On the nights of November Friday the 21st and Saturday the 22nd, we hosted our 2nd Annual Surf Art and the Surfer Art Show. The event was lead and coordinated by our Surfers Leadership School students as a part of their class project. Between both nights, over 350 people attended to see live art and the work of artists such as Paul Forney, Mark Brown, Leanna Duncan-Wolf, and many more. It was quite an extravaganza bringing the art community to Wahiawa. On Friday night, live music was provided by the Ron Artis II band, while Streetlight Cadence performed Saturday evening. Various vendors and foodtrucks participated in the event as well.  Awareness was not only brought towards Surfing the Nations, but also Wahiawa and surfers in Bangladesh.

One of the significant moments of Saturday night was the presentation of a check for $60,000 for the building of the Community Outreach Training Center, given by First Hawaiian Bank.

President of First Hawaiian Bank, Sharon Shiroma Brown, who has been an advocate of STN from the beginning stages, presented the check.

”When I first got the offer on my desk from Surfing The Nations, I said to my friend ‘Take me there!’ I wanted to meet Cindy Bauer. I wanted to see what was happening in Wahiawa. It just surprised me, in terms of what was happening here (before), and I’m so glad I came out. I met Cindy and I saw her vision and how passionate she was; how committed she was to make this all happen and we (First Hawaiian Bank) are so proud to help in this transformation.

 

 

Check out photos from the event on our flickr page!

Philippines Instagram Eye Candy

The Philippines team arrives back in the Hawaii tomorrow!

We have been drooling over their insta feeds…believe it or not, there is a natural beauty that even surpasses Hawaii, and it’s all over the remote Philippine islands!

We’ll give you a full update on what the team got up to when they return, but for now, here’s some travel eye candy to add to your Halloween bucket.

Unleash the wanderlust and sign up for next year’s trip now!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos by Mitchell Guapo, Kate Amm, Allie Wiebe, Mirjam Torstenston, Adriana Weber.

1) The boardwalk to Cloud 9.  2) Taking advantage of secret surf spots! 3) Cuteness overload 4) Getting ready to go help out at a food distribution 5) Speaking of food…a lechon on Dako Island 6) The men take the weight and lug donations from village to village…in some inventive ways!  7) The adventure and beauty of the Philippines is endless  8) Kids line up to receive a snack 9) Sunset watching on Jing and Jasmin’s boat.

 

 

 

 

Next up…Morocco!

The Middle East trip has been an integral part of STN’s international program for years.

From the shores of Egypt to the ruins of Turkey, no trip looks quite like the other, but each one offers an incredible amount of adventure. 

Surfing The Nations is excited to announce this year’s Winter trip is to the intoxicating land of Morocco!

The trip is full for this year, but stay tuned for updates on the trip and follow the team on instagram with the hashtag #stngo

 

Cover photo from dragonkiteschool.com

 

Until Next Time, Sri Lanka.

Today’s blog comes from Katie Redmond, our incredible, world-traveling humanitarian barista at Surfers Coffee Bar! Katie just recently returned from an STN surf trip to Sri Lanka! Here she shares about the land of the Jungle Book and all she experienced there.

In 1998, Sri Lanka breached the radar of Surfing the Nations. STN found the world-class point break wave known as Main Point on the tip of Arugam Bay, Sri Lanka. Sixteen years later, I had the privilege of seeing this masterpiece with my very own eyes on the 12th annual Surfing The Nations outreach trip.

Myself and five others trekked across the width of Sri Lanka from Colombo to Arugam Bay where we spent the entirety of our 24 day trip. Our team consisted of five who came with Surfing The Nations, and we were also joined by a couple from Italy, a team from Bali, a team from Southern California, and a local family.

In an environment with a widespread mix of locals and tourists, it was refreshing to stay in a village where we could really get to know the people. I could take a walk through the village and see faces that have names I knew at every turn. We held a number of activities during our stay: women’s tea, surf school, movie night, and, my favorite, Family Night.

On Family Night, we would hop in a tuk tuk to the next city and bought multitudes of chickens, coconuts, vegetables, spices and rice. The smells were overwhelming. Surrounded by mothers, daughters, and sisters, we sat crowded on a single mat on the floor, cutting kilos of vegetables and the largest amount of garlic I have ever seen. We then started serving families the creation we made. We started with 70 paper plates and soon found ourselves scrounging for more. Ninety people ate dinner with us in one night. These evenings were filled with laughter, family, dancing, spicy food, and warmth. The families adopted us into theirs so quickly; I marvel at their acceptance and long to be back in it.

Whether the waves were pumping way overhead or barely a ripple, we surfed and swam the East coast of Sri Lanka. Joining us were children and women who once were terrified of the ocean as they watched it rip their village apart in the 2004 tsunami. I watched a woman who once would not leave her home alone catch her first wave, and I understood her reality in a new way. In a highly Muslim community, infused with Buddhism and Hinduism, it is not a culture that is comfortable with women surfers.  This woman was  also mother of a Sri Lankan surfer and she has seen the opportunities her son had been given through surfing. He competed in the Red Bull Ride My Wave competition, and she began to encourage the girls in her family to surf.

In a culture so founded on family, it is surprising to see the absence a father figure plays in the children’s lives. As we surfed or swam with the local boys daily, we found they were longing to be involved in everything we did. They even volunteered to help us rebuild the STN Sri Lankan property fence.  A group of eight 16 year old boys, one father, and the 5 of us partially clueless team members worked side by side for days and hours. These boys with pasts I can barely put into words simply want to be wanted and to do something significant.

Finally, the day to leave the country I had come to love arrived. We walked the village, stopping house to house to say our goodbyes. One of the 16 year old boys we spent a lot of time with hugged us all and simply said, “No goodbye. See you later”.

Until next time Sri Lanka, until next time

 

-KR

 

 

The author sporting Sri Lankan women’s style

 

At The RedBull Contest

Bonding At The Beach

Surfing At The RedBull Comp

Surf At The RedBull Comp

Some Of The Team With Local Friends

See you later, Sri Lanka

 

Pioneering New Surf Frontiers: North Korea

In a history-making moment this past July, 19 surfers departed the USA, Europe, Asia and Australia to bring one of the most freeing experiences known to man – surfing – to the most closed nation on earth: The Democratic Peoples’ Republic of Korea (a.k.a. North Korea). Each person returned with incredible stories about a country that very few foreigners have experienced.

 

The main purpose of the trip was to lead two surf camps, showing the North Koreans how to enjoy their coastline with the sport of wave riding. The students were 10 tour guides from the country’s official tour group, Korean International Travel Company (KITC). Along with the surf camps, the team spent a total of 10 days within the DPRK touring the capital, Pyongyang, visiting museums and experiencing various exhibitions of North Korean culture.

 

Julie Nelson, staff member at STN and one of the first women to surf the shores of North Korea, planned and led the surf camps along with co-worker Ryley Snyder. “It was surreal,” explained Julie, “I grew up watching films like The Endless Summer but it’s crazy to think that such isolated places like those in the film still exist today!” Even though the concept of surfing was completely new to the North Koreans, they met the new sport with a strong enthusiasm. “People were so excited to surf that they even tired us out!” Ryley said.

 

At the end of the surf camps the team held an awards ceremony, in which each instructor affirmed and acknowledged their KITC pupils and then gave them each a chance to speak about their experience. “I specifically remember three of the people who shared,” long-term staff member Robert McDaniel said. “The man I taught to surf was probably the best surfer of the group. He stood up the most and was the most active. I remember pushing him on a wave and thinking that if the one reason I came to North Korea was for this one wave, then it was enough. At the awards ceremony he stood up and told us, ‘Surfing is my best friend.’ Among the other participants, was a man who shared that he believes surfing is bringing peace between Korea and America. Another KITC surf pupil shared, ‘Surfing has made me brave. Before this I didn’t want to try things…I was afraid. Now I want to try new things.’”

 

Of course, everyone wants to know what the surf was like in North Korea! For two of the surf days the coast was like a lake, but on the third day an offshore typhoon generated a little swell, perfect for beginning surfers. The final day, consistent, glassy, overhead sets came in. The STN team had an amazing session all to themselves, and their students were treated to a show of the best surfing they’d ever seen. The locals of the Majon area named the surf spot “Pioneers”.

 

Robert, who has served on STN’s international department and been on most of STN’s international surf trips, said that in comparison to all his travels, nothing was quite like North Korea. “This was the first time seeing surfing enter a country. Being able to witness the first moments of a nation’s surf history was incredible. People know Hawaii as the first place that was surfed, and you just wonder, could North Korea be known as one of the last?’’

STN is hoping that this is not the last time they’ll be in North Korea, and with the stoke already spreading in the country, there is sure to be a demand for more boards besides the 13 they already left behind on this trip, knowledge and instruction in the future. STN is excited to see North Koreans gain a love for the water in their own country, and become, like the surf spot, ‘Pioneers’ for the surf culture of North Korea.

 

 

The Surf Camp 

 

 

And when the surf picked up…

 

I N D O N E S I A

The 17th Annual Indonesia trip has come to a close. I had the amazing opportunity to lead this adventure trip full of amazing people. Our diverse team of 21 included surfers, photographers, musicians, college students, and a family of four!

We started in Kuta, Bali and over the course of three and a half weeks, went to Bingin, Uluwatu, and Desert Point on Lombok. After that, we jumped on a boat for 7 days to Gili, Sumbawa and Nusa Lembongan. The Indo trip being a surf tour, the team got great surf at world class breaks: Impossibles, Scar Reef, Desert Point, and Shipwrecks, just to name a few. At one point, we sailed through such rough waters that our boat nearly capsized, beating any roller coaster ride money could buy, and causing us all to laugh uncontrollably as we slipped across the boat.

When trying to describe the overall experience of Indonesia, I find myself coming back to the same word:

WILD.

The surf was both perfect and threatening, the culture was colorful and bold, and the wildlife is up close and personal, a lesson quickly learned from repeat monkey invasions! The nature around us was captivating: the cliffs of Uluwatu, the views of Bingin Beach, the long jaw-dropping barrels at Desert Point, and the breathtaking views of  rugged Sumbawa.

On top of getting amazing surf and a ton of laughs, we were consistently reaching out to the communities around us. One of the most amazing experiences was when we were in Desert Point on Lombok.We met a man who had his house halfway built and needed the funds and work to finish it. We had a contractor and a carpenter on the team with us, so they went to his house to check it out.After assessing the need and figuring out what we could do, the team pooled together and provided enough funds for him to get 20 days worth of labor and all the supplies he needed to have his house completed. This man was just one of the people we were able to help on the trip. We passed out clothing and school supplies everywhere we went, helped meet practical needs whenever we could, hung out with the locals, and made lifelong friends.

We also had Cameron Taylor with us, a Hawaii bodyboarder sponsored by Empire bodyboards.Empire generously stocked Cameron up with some brand new bodyboards to give to the kids in one of the most remote locations, Desert Point village on the island of Lombok. When you saw the kids get the chance to play on a board in the waters that they live right in front of their entire lives, you know it’s a gift that will keep on giving.People ask me if Indonesia was good, and I tell them Indonesia was everything: It was good, it was fun, it was hard, it was tiring, it was crazy, it was totally different from anything I’ve done, it was adventure at its essence, and it was worth every second!

For more info on the Indo trip, or to apply for next year, visit www.surfingthenations.com or email go@surfingthenations.com

To see photos from our trips on instagram search #stngo

Check out some photos below from our amazing photographer Kara Donovan! For more, check out our flickr account!

 

From North Shore to North Korea

There are very few unexplored frontiers remaining in the world of surfing! These territories remain un-surfed primarily because of their remote and geographically hazardous locations such as Antarctica, West Africa and Eastern Russia. However, there is one country with a much more accessible location, having approximately 1,550 miles of coastline that have yet to be explored via surfboard – North Korea.

In 2003, STN was the forerunner of surfing and surf culture in Bangladesh. This year, we have a similar opportunity to pioneer the sport in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (a.k.a. North Korea) through an invitation to host two surf camps…which we, of course, could not pass up.

At the end of July, our team of 19 STN members from around the world (including countries such as Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, Australia and the USA) will be working in conjunction with Pyongyang Ocean Sports Club and other non-profit humanitarian organizations who foster community development and relief work. The surf camps will be held on the east coast of North Korea in the East China Sea, a region of water surrounding North Korea previously inaccessible. Now, however, we have been given the opportunity to enjoy the waves at STN’s surf camps: one at Shijung beach and the other at either Wonsan Bay or Majung.

Google satellite images show potential for epic (and completely empty) surf spots, revealing sneak-peeks at sandy-bottomed beach breaks and point breaks striped with an endlessly rolling lineup. In addition to taking a traditional tour of the capital city, Pyongyang, the team will spend the majority of the two week trip ‘giving back’ by sharing their passion for the sport of surfing. STN will also be bringing surfboards, wetsuits, and other surf gear to give to the “new” North Korean surfers to keep up their stoke for surfing after our team departs. Along with establishing a long-term surf community, we are hoping this trip will build a bridge between STN and the people of North Korea and allow us to return annually in the future.

 

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Be part of this trip! Send your support of surf gear or finances, email go@surfingthenations.com or visit surfingthenations.com/donate.

Photo Credit: http://www.arcticsurfblog.com/2012/07/surf-guide-to-north-korea/ 

Written By: Akela Newman

An Unexpected Adventure In China

Meet Mitchell Guapo. A fresh-faced, 18 year old native of the High Desert of California. After graduating high school, Mitchell came to Oahu and interned with Surfing The Nations. Seeing that Surfing The Nations was a great place from which to impact the world around him, he joined STN’s full time staff as the coordinator of Ulu Pono Teens program for at-risk youth. A life in Hawaii was already far beyond his wildest dreams, but little did he know the ride was about to get that much crazier!

A few months ago, the founders of Zhou Enlai Peace Institute from China came by to check out STN’s vintage shop, The Vintage. After receiving a tour of STN, they were inspired and asked if a representative from STN could come and speak at a conference they were putting on for Chinese youth. They were looking specifically for a teenager from STN to represent the youth of America. Mitchell’s young age made him the perfect candidate for this opportunity!

It was my first time leaving the country so I was stoked!’ explains Mitchell. He was given the task of preparing a 20 minute speech about how to achieve world peace, and deliver it to a large audience. ‘That was definitely one of the biggest challenges: getting mentally prepared to talk to over 1,000 people!’ Few of us can feel prepared to talk about achieving world peace at any age, much less at 18! Mitchell’s main points boiled down to this message: We can only achieve peace in our homes, communities and the world after we have found peace within ourselves.

He arrived in Shanghai after flying for over 11 hours. Mildly jet-lagged and extremely excited, Mitchell made his way to speak at the event in Tong Li. In the ballroom of a hotel, he looked at the place where he would be speaking from. “It was a massive stage, with a large LED screen behind me, a runway before me, and an audience made up of people from all over the world.”  The whole set up was mind blowing. Nerves aside, Mitchell delivered his talk with the help of a translator, and received roaring applause.

Mitchell ended up staying in China for a total of ten days, spoke a few more times and made plenty of new friendships. When asked for his favorite memory of the trip, he was at a loss for words. “The entire experience was great; from the people to the city to the food, it’s hard to choose just one highlight. One the coolest things was hearing from the both the youth and adults about how inspired they were to see a counter-cultural lifestyle. They were surprised to find out that I was a full time volunteer, and moved by the fact that people believe in what I’m doing at STN enough to sponsor me to be on staff there. I’m glad I got to inspire them to live selflessly and out of the box in their own communities.”
Mitchell is back in action here at Surfing the Nations, continuing to mentor the youth in Wahiawa. At only eighteen years old, Mitchell has already been able to express just a few of his “out-of-the-box” passions and dreams at Surfing the Nations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bangladesh 2014

This Spring, Surfing The Nations embarks on their 10th annual Bangladesh Surfing Adventure, from April 9th until May 3rd. The team will be venturing to the outer island of St. Martin, as well as surfing Cox’s Bazar, and holding the annual Freedom Surf Contest, the only surf contest in the country.

In keeping with their mission of giving back, the team is collecting surf gear and clothing for the surf club in Cox’s Bazar, and also bringing clothing and supplies to the Burmese refugee population.

It is incredible to see how the sport has grown since STN first started to go to Bangladesh in 2004, and even more fascinating to see how surfing has impacted Bengali girls. Nasima is one of those girls whom STN has had the privilege to introduce surfing to.

Filmmaker Heather Kessinger was inspired to capture the story of Nasima and give a glimpse into the life of the young women in Bangladesh. The final leg of the film entitled ‘The Most Fearless’ will include footage from the Freedom Surf Contest.

Check out the trailer for ‘The Most Fearless’ below and watch this space for more updates on the trip!

(Don’t forget to follow us on instagram @surfingthenations and watch the hashtag #stngo for photo updates!)

 

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